***Photo Advisory***

For Immediate Release:
March 27, 2014

Contact: Greg Moore
517-373-2426

LANSING, Mich.— State Sen. Mike Nofs, R-Battle Creek, welcomed the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi (NHBP) Tribal Council to the Michigan Senate today.

Nofs and House Speaker Bolger awarded Council Chair Homer Mandoka, Vice-Chair Jamie Stuck, and Secretary Dorie Rios state tributes. The three council members have all been recognized nationally in the past year for outstanding tribal leadership. Under the leadership of the current council, the NHBP has become a national model of innovation and stability in tribal government.

Pictured are Speaker of the House Jase Bolger (left), Homer Mandoka (center), tribal council chairman and Nofs (right).

 

PPT repeal measure signed by governor

For Immediate Release                
March 28, 2014              

Contact: Greg Moore
517-373-2426
                                                                     

LANSING, Mich.— Legislation dealing with the elimination of the Personal Property Tax (PPT) was signed into law Friday in Lansing, said Sen. Mike Nofs, R-Battle Creek.

Senate Bill 822, which represents one of the final legislative actions necessary to effectively repeal the PPT, will help fund vital assistance to local governments. The elimination of the PPT has been a priority of this session as it is a tax that is considered dated and a barrier to new investment by municipal leaders and the business community alike.

“I want to thank Lieutenant Governor Calley and his staff, as well as all those who worked so hard crafting this bi-partisan legislation,” said Nofs. “This marks the conclusion of nearly four years of work and represents an important step in making Michigan more competitive for job providers.”

SB 822 is now Public Act 80 of 2014.

 

Nofs bill will assist law enforcement teams

For Immediate Release
March 21, 2014

Contact: Greg Moore
517-373-2426

LANSING, Mich.— Gov. Rick Snyder has signed a bill authored by Sen. Mike Nofs that will help law enforcement agencies that choose to share resources to better serve their communities. 

The Urban Cooperation Act of 1967 allows such combinations, which are most frequently found in the form of taskforces that focus on a single type of crime.

A 2008 Michigan Supreme Court ruling found that when police agencies combine their resources, a new legal entity is automatically created that does not have the liability protections afforded to regular law enforcement agencies. Public Act 36 of 2014 clarifies that an inter-local agreement does not create a new entity unless that is a specific condition of the agreement.

“This legislation simply removes a legal barrier that has served as a deterrent to inter-local cooperation,” said Nofs, R-Battle Creek. “Criminals are becoming more sophisticated every day and the police need all the tools available to successfully protect Michigan residents.”